Type Archive: video

In the snowy winter, a beaver must work to keep a hole in the ice. He is cranky and slow-moving. The otter, on the other hand, is having fun sliding down hills and pestering the beaver! Watch this fun little video for a peek into the interaction between these two species in the dead of winter.

Beaver vs. Otter

Cornell Lab of Ornithology and National Geographic have teamed up for a project in New Guinea (in the Asian Pacific) to research all 39 species of the birds of paradise. Cornell scientist Ed Scholes and Nat Geo photographer Tim Laman have spent nearly a decade photographing and studying the crazy plumage and displays of these extremely unique species. Watch an overview of the project in the video below, and use the link to explore the project website.

Birds-of-Paradise Project

Birds of Paradise Project

There are two species of Desman — aquatic insectivores that use their sensitive, flexible long snout to hunt for prey in the riverbed. The Russian Desman, Desmana moschata, lives in a small area of northwestern Asia and was once hunted for its thick, water-resistant pelt, even though the whole animal is only about 8 inches long! Besides insects, this desman eats crayfish and amphibians. Desmans are related to moles.

ARKive: Russian desman

The Russian Desman

The silk floss tree, Ceiba speciosa, is related to baobob and kapok trees and features the family’s swollen trunk. Not only does it have huge showy flowers up to 6 inches across, but its bark is covered in spikelets that hold water. As if it weren’t unique enough already, when young the trunk of this tree is green with chlorophyll, performing some of the photosynthesis for the plant. With age, the trunk turns grey.

Watch the nearly silent video tour of a silk floss tree, and click the links below the video to learn more — including how it got its name!

Wikipedia
Top Tropicals (*nice pics!)
FloriData

Silk Floss Tree

The Eurasian harvest mouse, Micromys minutus, is not only Europe’s smallest rodent, but it is also the continent’s only animal with a prehensile (grasping) tail. The nest this tiny one weaves also takes the prize for the most complex of any European mammal. The little harvest mouse splits and bends stalks of grass, eventually forming a spherical structure about 4 or 5 inches wide. These tiny rodents live only about 6 months, and even in captivity 18 months is the record.

More pics & info on Encyclopedia of Life
More pics & video on ARKive

Europe’s Smallest Rodent

The lowly wintergreen, Gaultheria procumbens, grows only 4 to 6 inches tall but features bright white nodding flowers that morph into bright red edible berries, and leaves that give us the familiar wintergreen flavor. A North American wildflower, it grows on the forest floor of most of the eastern half of the United States. Watch the video to learn to identify this plant with ease.

Range map & info
Gardener’s Notes!

Wintergreen

The Regal Horned Lizard, Phrynosoma solare, lives in the desert areas of the southwestern United States and Mexico. It eats mostly ants, and it is immune to ant venom. When disturbed by a potential predator, this little lizard squirts its own blood out of its eyeball with precise aim, targeting his attacker’s face. Apparently this blood has some type of odor or taste that repels the predator. Click the links below the video for more videos, pics, and information on this crazy critter with its unique defense!

Discovery Channel Video
SW Center for Herp Research
California Herps

Blood Squirting Lizard!

The Eastern Barred Bandicoot, Perameles gunnii, is a small endangered species in Australia. It has one of the shortest gestation periods (pregnancy) of all mammals — it gives birth after only 12 to 13 days! This fun video from an Australian zoo will tell you more, as will the links below it (more pics, too!).

Wildscreen ARKive
Werribee Zoo (Australia)

Eastern Barred Bandicoot

This amazing little European wildflower, Arum maculatum, is not only poisonous, but it is also known by about 100 different names!
Watch this short but informative video — or click the link above — to learn more! 😀

Arum maculatum Video

The St. Lucia or iSimangaliso Wetland Park in the southeastern corner of Africa features a wide variety of wildlife habitats including forest, inland lake, swamp, sand dunes, and coastal waters where whales make their annual migrations.

iSimangaliso Wetland Park

David Attenborough narrates this fun little video clip featuring a brightly colored newly emerged “Kung Fu Mantis” facing down a hungry jumping spider. Fun, fun! 😀

Kung Fu Mantis video

Is this the “richest part of the ocean anywhere on the planet”?
According to this video, the Philippines takes this prize!
Check out the biodiversity of this World Hot Spot!

Philippine Biodiversity!

Is the Bateleur Africa’s most colorful eagle?

Bateleur Eagle Video

Did you know the TUATARA has a “third eye”?

Most Unique Reptile!

A well-made slideshow portraying the beauty and wildness that is The Camargue:

The Camargue in Pictures

Don’t blink! You’ll miss this pet Horned Frog gobbling its prey!

Pet Horned Frog

Watch this fun BBC video featuring David Attenborough and a band of banded mongooses (Mungos mungo).

More on this charming species:
Arkive
Animal Diversity Web
BBC Nature
Siyabona Africa

Band of Banded Mongooses

Some insects secrete chemicals that force their host plants to protect them!

The Gall Makers

The Augrabies or Broadley’s Flat Lizard (Platysaurus broadleyi) entertains not only with its flat-bellied display to rival males, but also in its aerial hunting skills, leaping into the air to catch flies.

More on this species:
Arkive
Encyclopedia of Life

Flat Lizards

The Giant Puffball (Calvatia gigantea) is edible!
How’d you like to find this in your backyard?!

Edible Puffball