Type Archive: video

Nearly an hour long, this older but still good documentary on the Great Barrier Reef of Australia is available in full on YouTube:

Great Barrier Reef Documentary

The Philippine eagle, Pithecophaga jefferyi, is one of the largest and most rare birds in the world, and is found only on the Philippine islands. This critically endangered species mates for life and only produces offspring every other year. They typically live for about 30 years in the wild, feeding on medium-size animals such as monkeys, civets, lemurs, flying squirrels, other birds, and even small deer. Click the links below to learn more!

Wikipedia   |   ADW   |   ARKive
National Geographic   |   EDGE
Eagle Directory   |   HBW Alive
Peregrine Fund   |   BirdLife Intn’l

Philippine Eagle

The Bat Eared Fox, Otocyon megalotis, is about the size of your average domestic house cat, and eats a diet of insects in the African savannah. Check out the video and links below for more on this endearing fox species.

Siyabona Africa
ARKive (fox kit pics!)
Animal Diversity Web
The Animal Files

Bat Eared Fox

The Banded Demoiselle, Calopteryx splendens, is a very common and easily identifiable species of damselfly in the UK and adjacent parts of Eurasia, with a range extending all the way to northern China. The video below shows the process of mating and egg laying, while the links below the video will give you much more information about this intriguing species. Check out how the mating couple form the shape of a heart!

Encyclopedia of Life (lots of pics!)
First Nature
ARKive
Nature Spot

Banded Demoiselle Mating

A short video featuring the beautiful Pine Grosbeak and its call:

More on the Pine Grosbeak

Pine Grosbeak’s Call

Hornbill Nest Video

The desert heat has evaporated so much water from the Umm Al-maa oasis in the Sahara desert, that it is saltier than the sea. Yet migrating sparrows feast here. How? Watch this short little clip from BBC’s Africa documentary series to find out.

Poisonous Sahara Oasis

Here is a fun 5 1/2 minute video of 5 different micro creatures, listed below.

Euglena
Micro-worms
Daphnia
Rotifer
Seamonkey

Microscopic Farm

Here’s a little clip from BBC Earth’s hard-to-find series, Wild Caribbean. It features acrobatic and highly intelligent capuchin monkeys in a coastal forest area of Costa Rica.

Caribbean Capuchins

This is one of the greatest moments of nature film history: BBC and David Attenborough introducing one of the world’s best bird mimics, who can even immitate human sounds such as cameras and chainsaws: the superb lyre bird!

Best Bird Mimic

The crown-tipped coral fungus is white to yellowish and about an inch or two tall with little spikey crown-shaped tops on its “branches”. It grows on long-dead wood in North America and is edible, with a peppery taste that tends to disappear when cooked. The video below describes where to find this fungus species, how to identify it, and how to harvest and cook it. The links below the video feature more pics and species information.

Artomyces pyxidatus
Crown-Tipped Coral
Mushroom Expert

Crown Tipped Coral Fungus

Here’s a long critter cam video — almost 15 minutes in length! of a fishing cat kitten from southeast Asia, exploring its watery habitat.

More about the Fishing Cat

Fishing Cat Kitten

The amazing peacock spider, Maratus speciosus, performs a lively and entertaining dance for the camera…

More on this species:
Amusing Planet
Live Science

Peacock Spider Dance

Great (or Northern) Crested Newts, Triturus cristatus, large for their type, are found across northern Europe from the UK to Western Russia. Females are larger than males and sport a bright yellow and black-spotted underbelly. Males have the bright belly plus two separate crests: a more scalloped or tufted version down their back and two smoother ones on the top and bottom of the tail. You may also be able to spot a silvery stripe running along the sides of the male’s tail. Watch the video below and check out the links to learn about this unique amphibian species!

ARKive
Encyclopedia of Life
Freshwater Habitats Trust

Great Crested Newt

Jabiru are storks that live in Central and South America, especially in the wetlands of Brazil and Paraguay. They are the tallest flying bird in their range, with adult males sometimes reaching 5 feet in height — about as big as the flightless rhea! Jabiru means “swollen neck” and both males and females have their namesake. Males tend to be about 25% larger than females, however.

ARKive   ADW   EOL
Cornell Lab   Oiseaux-Birds

Jabiru

Perhaps the least known and most vulnerable species of bear is the Malayan Sun Bear or Honey Bear, Helarctos malayanus. This species grows to be only about half the size of black bears and lives in southeast Asia. They eat mostly insects, honey, and fruit, but will also eat small reptiles and rodents as well as eggs and a few plants such as sugar cane. Each sun bear has a unique lighter patch of fur on its chest, making it relatively easy to distinguish between individuals.

sun honey bear asia southeast java malayan Helarctos malayanus tongue out

ARKive     WWF     Nat Geo     ADW
A-Z Animals     EOL     Bears of the World

 

Malayan Sun Bear

The Green Spore Parasol mushroom, Chlorophyllum molybdites, is poisonous and can often grow in backyards and forest “fairy rings”. Watch the video and explore the links below to educate yourself and your loved ones about this common fungi.

Fungus of the Month
Urban Mushrooms
Mushroom Expert

POISONOUS Green Spore

The most famous of the cobras, and the world’s longest venomous snake, is the Indian Cobra (Naja naja). This is the famous “spectacled cobra” seen in snake charmer acts and is responsible for some 10,000 deaths each year. When alarmed, this snake fans out its long, flexible neck ribs to create its iconic “hood”. Indian cobras eat birds, rodents, and reptiles including other snakes. They often hunt in rice paddies and in other cultivated areas — even inside human settlements. Watch the video below to see one cobra that has decided to stick around in one family’s backyard.

Learn more about this beautiful but deadly species:
ARKive
Animal Diversity Web
Encyclopedia of Life

Indian Cobra

Can you believe it?! When an empty shell washes ashore, it triggers the local wild hermit crabs to perform one of nature’s craziest routines: They eventually line up from largest to smallest, and once in place without any significant gaps in sizing, they go down the line, moving into their new homes. The largest takes his new empty shell, the next largest takes his, and down the line until everyone has a new home. What a sense of humor our Creator has! 😀

Hermit Crab Lineup!

If they COULD read, dragonflies would do it almost 4 times as fast as we can! Their reaction time is so fast, they can fly out to catch something they see before we would even register any sight. Watch the short video below to learn more about the dragonfly’s super sense.

Dragonflies Speed Read?!