Tag Archives: pacific

Tarsiers have some of the largest eyes relative to their body size of any animal. This comes at a cost, however — they cannot rotate their eyeballs within the sockets but must rotate their entire heads instead. The Philippine tarsier, Carlito syrichta, lives only on a handful of islands in the Philippines. See where the other species live.

Carlito syrichta philippine tarsier tarsius islands endemic tiny primate mammals big eyes

Wikipedia   |   Flickr pics!
Endangered Species International
Bohol, Philippines   |   IUCN Red List
Tarsier Sanctuary   |   Philippine Tarsier Foundation on Facebook

The Philippine eagle, Pithecophaga jefferyi, is one of the largest and most rare birds in the world, and is found only on the Philippine islands. This critically endangered species mates for life and only produces offspring every other year. They typically live for about 30 years in the wild, feeding on medium-size animals such as monkeys, civets, lemurs, flying squirrels, other birds, and even small deer. Click the links below to learn more!

Wikipedia   |   ADW   |   ARKive
National Geographic   |   EDGE
Eagle Directory   |   HBW Alive
Peregrine Fund   |   BirdLife Intn’l

Philippine Eagle

The Oriental Sweetlips, Plectorhinchus vittatus, lives in reefs in the Indian and Pacific Oceans, near Indonesia. They have rather puffy lips, hence the name. 😛
This species really looks different between its juvenile and adult form! Young sweetlips are rather speckled with dark splotches on a light background. Eventually, these markings morph to black and white stripes with yellow tail, fins, and face. The bright yellow shows the splotches of youth, although they are smaller overall, more like spots. Check out the links below the pic to find out more about this unique species of grunt fish.

Plectorhinchus vittatus oriental sweetlips marine fish fishes yellow stripes morph change juvenile adult ocean reef indonesia pacific indian
Saltwater Smarts
Encyclopedia of Life

Cornell Lab of Ornithology and National Geographic have teamed up for a project in New Guinea (in the Asian Pacific) to research all 39 species of the birds of paradise. Cornell scientist Ed Scholes and Nat Geo photographer Tim Laman have spent nearly a decade photographing and studying the crazy plumage and displays of these extremely unique species. Watch an overview of the project in the video below, and use the link to explore the project website.

Birds-of-Paradise Project

Birds of Paradise Project

Did you know the TUATARA has a “third eye”?

Most Unique Reptile!

This animal is NOT a lizard!! It is a living dinosaur called a Tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus).

tuatara reptile unique new zealand endemic living dinosaur

Learn about this amazing creature:
San Diego Zoo
Wikipedia
New Zealand DOC
A-Z Animals