Tag Archives: field

North Side, South Side

They SAY that moss usually grows on the north side of trees, but this is just because the north side tends to be out of the sun during the most drying part of the day — leaving more moisture behind for mosses to grow.

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The honey locust tree, Gleditsia triacanthos, is easily identified by its combination of thorns, long narrow compound leaves, and long curly seedpods. Found in the eastern United States, this species is actually a legume, in the family Fabaceae. Its long seedpods resemble beans and peas, which are more familiar legumes. Honey locust pods start out green and eventually turn crisp and dark brown, growing up to about 7 inches long. The pods are sometimes eaten by livestock, which digest the pulp and excrete the seeds. Thorns are found on both the trunk and branches of this tree species, again starting out green, but then turning red, and eventually grey. Leaves of honey locust are pinnately divided, similar to mesquite and acacia.

Gleditsia triacanthos honey locust tree eastern united states long curly seed pods thorns trunk

Encyclopedia of Life (pics!)
Images of Honeylocust (some closeups)
Cultivation Info
Detailed Species Info

This unique Superfamily of insects, the Cercopoidea, has nymphs that encase themselves in what looks like spit (= spittlebugs) in order to protect them from heat and cold as well as from predators and parasites. The young insects use plant juices to make their own acrid concoctions. As adults, these insects can hop many times their length, thus gaining them the alternative name, Froghoppers. Click the links below the pic for more pics and info on these resourceful bugs!

spittlebug froghopper nymph cercopoidea family of insects tiny cute bug

iNaturalist: Spittlebugs
The Bug Guide
Encyclopedia of Life

The Eurasian harvest mouse, Micromys minutus, is not only Europe’s smallest rodent, but it is also the continent’s only animal with a prehensile (grasping) tail. The nest this tiny one weaves also takes the prize for the most complex of any European mammal. The little harvest mouse splits and bends stalks of grass, eventually forming a spherical structure about 4 or 5 inches wide. These tiny rodents live only about 6 months, and even in captivity 18 months is the record.

More pics & info on Encyclopedia of Life
More pics & video on ARKive

Europe’s Smallest Rodent

The Dwarf Mongoose

Best Dwarf Mongoose Video

Dwarf Mongoose videos on Facebook page of
Limpopo Dwarf Mongoose Research
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