Tag Archives: central america

The olingo, Bassaricyon spp, is sometimes mistaken for the kinkajou, but lacks the prehensile tail of that better-known species. In fact, olingos and kinkajous are competitors in their forest habitat. Both eat fruit and small vertebrates, but olingos will more readily hunt for small prey species. Olingos are nocturnal carnivores in the racoon family, but are currently undergoing a taxonomic revision, sometimes being held as a single species, sometimes divided into 4 or even 5 separate species. All live in the rainforests of Central and South America, from Nicaragua to Peru.

olingo bassaricyon south central america raccoon family nocturnal creatures eyes arboreal

Wikipedia   |   ADW
ARKive   |   EOL

Here’s a little clip from BBC Earth’s hard-to-find series, Wild Caribbean. It features acrobatic and highly intelligent capuchin monkeys in a coastal forest area of Costa Rica.

Caribbean Capuchins

Jabiru are storks that live in Central and South America, especially in the wetlands of Brazil and Paraguay. They are the tallest flying bird in their range, with adult males sometimes reaching 5 feet in height — about as big as the flightless rhea! Jabiru means “swollen neck” and both males and females have their namesake. Males tend to be about 25% larger than females, however.

ARKive   ADW   EOL
Cornell Lab   Oiseaux-Birds

Jabiru

What I like best about this tiny bird is its name: Have you ever heard of a gnatwren?! It is not a wren, yet it has the cocked tail and general appearance of one. It IS a type of gnatcatcher, but it doesn’t quite LOOK like one. This unique species is the only one in its genus, yet it has over a dozen subspecies. It lives in Central and South America, with an isolated population along the east coast of Brazil. Read more about this little feathered friend using the links below the pic.

long billed gnatwren Ramphocaenus melanurus central south america brazil forest tiny birds of the world

Birds of the World
iNaturalist
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Animalia Life

Tikal National Park in Guatemala (central America south of Mexico) is bursting with biodiversity, thanks in part to the Maya Biosphere Reserve next door!

tikal national park wildlife nature conservation maya biosphere reserve

Tikal Scientific Information (nature!)
Tikal National Park (UNESCO)
Maya Biosphere Reserve

The Wrinkle Face Bat (Centurio senex) might just be the ugliest mammal alive! Click the links below the video to see some close-ups of that face!

Bat’s Wrinkly Face Improves Sonar
Animal Diversity Web
Encyclopedia of Life

Wrinkle Face Bat

The blue milk mushroom, Lactarius indigo, can be found in North America, Central America, and East Asia. An edible blue mushroom — who’d’a thunk it?!!

blue mushroom Lactarius indigo milky america edible beautiful fungi unusual unique nature

More Info on this crazy species:
Mushroom Expert
Rogers Mushrooms
Morel Mushroom Hunting site