Tag Archives: california

The acorn weevil is native to the west coast of North America and is considered to be a pest to several types of oak tree there. This species of snout beetle lays eggs inside acorns which hatch out to produce larvae that consume the kernel inside the acorn, often causing considerable damage to the annual crop which other animals depend upon. Still, ya gotta admit the little guy is pretty cool looking:

Curculio occidentis acorn weevil north america bug pest acorns deformed california washington state

iNaturalist   |   Bug Guide

The Kellet’s Whelk, Kelletia kelletii, is a type of sea snail that is common to the middle and southern coast of California, on down to Baja California. This seemingly harmless shelled creature is both a predator and a scavenger, and it has quite a strange feeding apparatus: a long proboscis twice the length of its shell can dangle down to reach its prey that may be hiding in a rock crevice or on the sea floor. It uses a handy rasp to scrape off tissue, and sucks it up into its shell for digestion. Each whelk has only one of these feeding tubes, and you’d be amazed how many creatures have some type of proboscis!

Kelletia kelletii kellets whelk proboscis feeding rasping sucking shells california

iNaturalist
Encyclopedia of Life
SiMoN

There are thought to be seven distinct subspecies of Ensatina (Ensatina eschscholtzii). The map below shows distribution and examples of the wide variety of colorations for this single species in its genus. The ensatina is a lungless salamander who breathes through its skin and therefore must remain in moist habitat. When times get a bit dry, they can burrow down under logs and leaf litter until the above ground habitat becomes more moist once again.
Click the links below the map to find out more about this amazing species, and to see more pics of its variety! Scroll down on the first linked-to page to see entire pages of pics and videos for each of the seven subspecies! 😀

ensatina salamander species subspecies map california oregon washington canada spotten red black yellow brown tan

California Herps
Ensatina Natural History
Wild Herps

The Silk Tassel Bush, Garrya elliptica, is a serpentine endemic plant — meaning it can grow on soils that (for one thing) contain high concentrations of chromium and nickel.
This is truly a heavy metal plant! 😀
It is native to the West coast of the USA — California and Oregon. Check out the links below the pic for closeups of those crazy dangling flowers!

silk tassel bush serpentine endemic plant west coast california wildflower oregon garrya elliptica dangling flowers

San Fran Botanical Garden
Sonoma County Master Gardeners
Dave’s Garden (nice pics!)
California Native Plant Society
Plant Lust