Of course, the Green Anole is not always green, as it can change to brown in order to hide from predators (like humans!). This has earned it the nickname “American Chameleon” although it is NOT a chameleon but rather is one of over 350 species of Anolis which is often studied for their biodiversity as well as for their neurology. Remarkably, this latter study is conducted to further our understanding of human physiology and medicine. Green anoles, Anolis carolinensis, are native to the southeastern United States, often found around low buildings with exposed wood, or in bushes near homes.

green anole carolina Anolis carolinensis lizards reptiles common north america florida south

NatureWorks   ADW   EOL
iNaturalist   Harrel House
Backyard Nature: Naturalist Newsletter

The Yellow-Winged Bat — Lavia frons — forms a symbiotic relationship with a particular acacia tree in middle Africa, the notorious Umbrella Thorn Acacia, Acacia tortilis. Instead of flying out to pursue its insect prey, it roosts in the tree and during its waking cycle it moves about the branches, feeding on insects that would otherwise cause damage.

yellow winged bat cute sitting box nose ears cute lavia frons africa

More on the yellow-winged bat:
iNaturalist
Encyclopedia of Life
Animal Diversity Web

If they COULD read, dragonflies would do it almost 4 times as fast as we can! Their reaction time is so fast, they can fly out to catch something they see before we would even register any sight. Watch the short video below to learn more about the dragonfly’s super sense.

Dragonflies Speed Read?!

The Pied Butcherbird, Cracticus nigrogularis, has an AMAZING song! And if that wasn’t enough for this Australian songster, he also copies songs of other birds and even imitates human sounds!

Cracticus nigrogularis pied butcherbird birds australia song melodious copycat black and white feathers

Click play to hear this bird’s amazing song. You may enjoy this duet! 😀

Read more on iNaturalist
Handbook of Birds of the World
Birds in Backyards
Critters of Calamvale Creek

This strange-looking bird never outgrows his huge eye — this is not just an appealing baby face, but a full-grown Water Dikkop or Water Thick-knee of southern Africa!

water thick knee dikkop burhinus vermiculatus birds aves south africa wader

More Pics! (click the “Detail” tab for more info)
Vocalization (bird sound)
Beauty of Birds
Biodiversity Explorer

Most red-eyed vireos (Vireo olivaceus) breed in North America and overwinter in the Amazon basin of South America. During the breeding season, a single male may sing constantly, up to 10,000 times each day! Because of this and their canopy-feeding lifestyle, these little birds are often heard rather than seen, and their song is part of most forest soundtracks. If you can zoom in on an adult, you may be able to see its bright red eyes, but most commonly you will have to settle for its song and its olive green body with grey, black, and white head pattern for identification.

Vireo olivaceus red eyed vireo neotropical migration bird songbird forest

Find out more!
All About Birds
Encyclopedia of Life
BioKIDS
Audubon Field Guide

The Giant Puffball (Calvatia gigantea) is edible!
How’d you like to find this in your backyard?!

Edible Puffball

Cookeina tricholoma on Project Noah

Cookeina tricholoma cup fungi fungus mushrooms pink tiny delicate lovely leaf litter

North Side, South Side

They SAY that moss usually grows on the north side of trees, but this is just because the north side tends to be out of the sun during the most drying part of the day — leaving more moisture behind for mosses to grow.

north south side moss forest field investigation nature hike walk explore activity
Continue reading

My favorite animal of all time is the Rufous Sengi! How can anyone not be tickled by that long flexible snout and those huge black eyes?

This is just one type of elephant shrew
Find out more about this species

Rufous Sengi

Dwarf Mongoose (Helogale parvula)

helogale parvula dwarf mongoose species teeth dentition claws

This little guy in the Mongoose Family (Herpestidae) lives in eastern and southern Africa.

The Camargue is an area in southern France, a marshy delta area where the Rhone river flows into the Mediterranean Sea. In this area are wild horses and flamingos.

Click the links below the pic for more info on this beautiful wild habitat!

camargue france southern rhone delta wild horses marsh white green blue

The Camargue: France’s Wild West
Wikipedia
World Wildlife Fund

The Hoopoe (Upupa epops) is quite a unique-looking bird, don’t you think?
This species is widespread across Europe, Asia, and Africa.
It gets its name from its call: “Ooop! Ooop! Ooop!”

hoopoe crazy flashy colorful bird crest mohawk woodpecker roadrunner black and white feathers

More on this amazing bird:
Arkive
Eurasian Hoopoe
Encyclopedia of Life (hundreds of pics!)

Doesn’t this palm nut vulture (Gypohierax angolensis) remind you of an eagle with a vulture’s head and feet spliced on?

This African bird of prey is unique in that it prefers the fruit of the oil palm tree over meat! It also eats crabs, insects, and other small animals — as well as a few other species of palm nuts.

Gypohierax angolensis palm nut vulture accipitridae birds of prey africa african animals aves hooked beak

Learn more about this species:
Wikipedia
Encyclopedia of Life
Arkive
iNaturalist
Planet of Birds
Oiseaux Birds
Biodiversity Explorer

Here’s a fun, free, full-length documentary on turtles and tortoises. Can YOU tell the difference?

The lowly wintergreen, Gaultheria procumbens, grows only 4 to 6 inches tall but features bright white nodding flowers that morph into bright red edible berries, and leaves that give us the familiar wintergreen flavor. A North American wildflower, it grows on the forest floor of most of the eastern half of the United States. Watch the video to learn to identify this plant with ease.

Range map & info
Gardener’s Notes!

Wintergreen

Bird Tracks and Sign can be just as interesting and diverse as with mammals!

bird tracks and signs website link review nature tracking

 
Animal Tracks — Birds
 

The smallest whale, Kogia sima, grows to only about 9 feet long (about 2.7 meters). They are hard to spot, but are found most commonly in the waters near the southern United States.

NOAA dwarf sperm whale leaping small kogia sima

Find out more!
CMS: Whales & Dolphins
Cascadia Research
MarineBio

TutorVista.com has a cute little introduction to the Fungi Kingdom.

cartoon drawings fungi mushrooms kingdom

This web page provides a definition, a list of characteristics, four basic divisions of the kingdom with examples of each, and some other useful information.

The Hoopoe (Upupa epops) is the national bird of Israel — and what a beautiful bird!

national bird of israel hoopoe upupa epops black and white crested