The bateleur eagle (Terathopius ecaudatus) has amazing colors — check out some of those links below the pic!

arkive bateleur terathopius ecaudatus black eagle africa wild birds of prey world

Siyabona Africa (best pic!)
ARKive (pics and videos!)
The Eagle Directory
The Peregrine Fund

Hornbill Nest Video

The desert heat has evaporated so much water from the Umm Al-maa oasis in the Sahara desert, that it is saltier than the sea. Yet migrating sparrows feast here. How? Watch this short little clip from BBC’s Africa documentary series to find out.

Poisonous Sahara Oasis

The crown-tipped coral fungus is white to yellowish and about an inch or two tall with little spikey crown-shaped tops on its “branches”. It grows on long-dead wood in North America and is edible, with a peppery taste that tends to disappear when cooked. The video below describes where to find this fungus species, how to identify it, and how to harvest and cook it. The links below the video feature more pics and species information.

Artomyces pyxidatus
Crown-Tipped Coral
Mushroom Expert

Crown Tipped Coral Fungus

Pitcher Plant seed pods: look at that texture!

seed pod sarracenia pitcher plant

There are thought to be seven distinct subspecies of Ensatina (Ensatina eschscholtzii). The map below shows distribution and examples of the wide variety of colorations for this single species in its genus. The ensatina is a lungless salamander who breathes through its skin and therefore must remain in moist habitat. When times get a bit dry, they can burrow down under logs and leaf litter until the above ground habitat becomes more moist once again.
Click the links below the map to find out more about this amazing species, and to see more pics of its variety! Scroll down on the first linked-to page to see entire pages of pics and videos for each of the seven subspecies! 😀

ensatina salamander species subspecies map california oregon washington canada spotten red black yellow brown tan

California Herps
Ensatina Natural History
Wild Herps

This animal is NOT a lizard!! It is a living dinosaur called a Tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus).

tuatara reptile unique new zealand endemic living dinosaur

Learn about this amazing creature:
San Diego Zoo
Wikipedia
New Zealand DOC
A-Z Animals

This spikey little amphibian lives in Japan. At one time it also could be found in Taiwan, but has become extinct there due to habitat loss and capture for the pet trade.

Crocodile Newts grow to only about 6 to 7 inches long including their tail, and their ribs actually end in protruding spikes that serve as protection against predators.

echinotriton andersoni alligator crocodile newt andersons japan salamander moss dark spikes amphibians wild

ARKive: Anderson’s crocodile newt
Alligator Newt: St. Louis Zoo
CC: (great pics!)

What do mires, fens, bogs, moors, muskegs, and pocosins all have in common? Peat!
Learn more about peat on Wikipedia!

harvesting regulating peat in Ireland turbary right to cut peat turf

Little Church Buried in Peat
Peat Into Coal (scroll down)
Regulating Peat Harvest: Turbary

With oily fur to shed the water with a shake, the water shrew (Sorex palustris) can live a life that few other insect eaters can maintain. These little guys can dive underwater and hunt for insect larvae and small fish, then swim back to the surface and nibble on worms, snails, and even mushrooms. Water shrews are so light and bouyant that they must paddle hard just to stay submerged. They live mostly in mountain streams and nest in logs or underground burrows.

 
water shrew sorex palustris american insectivore mammals arkive

ARKive
ADW
BioKIDS

Like other deciduous larches, the subalpine larch, Larix lyallii, sheds its needles each year. The trees make a grand show up there near the treeline, with their yellow needles and often twisted form. Further down the mountains, they tend to be taller and grow straighter. Fresh new twigs have single needles, whereas older twigs have clusters of needles growing from a little raised knot along the twig. Cones are spherical with long bracts extending out past each scale, giving the cones a shaggy appearance. These trees grow along with their very close and very similar relative, Larix occidentalis, in the upper Rocky Mountains and Cascade range in the northwestern United States and nearby regions of Canada.

Larix lyallii subalpine alpine larch northwest canada united states trees treeline mountains deciduous needles

The Gymnosperm Database
The Wild Garden
Burke Museum
Virginia Tech

Strange deer from China with cloven hooves like cow feet!

Pere David Deer

Don’t blink! You’ll miss this pet Horned Frog gobbling its prey!

Pet Horned Frog

This is one of the greatest moments of nature film history: BBC and David Attenborough introducing one of the world’s best bird mimics, who can even immitate human sounds such as cameras and chainsaws: the superb lyre bird!

Best Bird Mimic

Doesn’t this palm nut vulture (Gypohierax angolensis) remind you of an eagle with a vulture’s head and feet spliced on?

This African bird of prey is unique in that it prefers the fruit of the oil palm tree over meat! It also eats crabs, insects, and other small animals — as well as a few other species of palm nuts.

Gypohierax angolensis palm nut vulture accipitridae birds of prey africa african animals aves hooked beak

Learn more about this species:
Wikipedia
Encyclopedia of Life
Arkive
iNaturalist
Planet of Birds
Oiseaux Birds
Biodiversity Explorer

This tiny Earth Tongue is only about an inch tall!

earth tongue geoglossum club fungi tiny moss black mushroom

Mushroom Expert
Wikipedia
Encyclopedia of Life

cidadamania.com cicadas fans gifts for boys kids who love bugs insects cicadidae

Need a gift for a kid who loves bugs?
Explore CicadaMania.com for info and treasures!

Nearly an hour long, this older but still good documentary on the Great Barrier Reef of Australia is available in full on YouTube:

Great Barrier Reef Documentary

The colorful and unique Christmas Tree Worm, Spirobranchus giganteus, adds to the excitement of diving in tropical coral reefs all around the world. Their colorful plumes, always appearing as an identical pair, are used for both breathing and feeding. The plumes are covered with tiny hairs that trap food in the water and sweep it towards the animal’s mouth.

Spirobranchus giganteus christmas tree worm colorful coral reef plumes

EOL   |   Wikipedia
Caribbean Reefs
Great Barrier Reef
Mother Nature Network

Periodic Cicada Video